--
SHARES
  

This fall as part of our Labor Day biking trip, we camped for a few nights at Point Supreme campground in the Cedar Breaks National Monument. Cedar Breaks is located in Southwest Utah near Brian Head and Panguitch.  It’s best known for the badlands rock formations and erosions that have occurred there, creating amazing red rock landscapes.

One of the many overlooks at Cedar Breaks National Monument

One of the many overlooks at Cedar Breaks National Monument

The campground sits at about 10,000ft and has several pros and cons.  The campground has 25 camp sites and can accomodate tents and RVs. However, many of the sites are quite small and some seem unusually close together. Still, the views from most of these sites are really nice.  You can see out into high alpine meadows where deer and other wildlife roam.

The sites are $14/night and and you can make reservations on www.recreation.gov.  Being able to reserve a site and have that peace of mind is huge when you’re on a road trip.

Our campsite at Point Supreme Campground in Cedar Breaks National Monument

Our campsite at Point Supreme Campground in Cedar Breaks National Monument

A few other great perks that we discovered after arriving were free hot showers and almost-free firewood. At lots of national forest campgrounds firewood is $5 – $6 a bundle. It’s usually enough for a night. Here, firewood required a donation of whatever you felt like giving, and for that you could fill up an entire 5-gallon bucket. We ended up with wood left over! The showers were a huge plus and a complete surprise. They have a key-code, so once you check in with the hosts they’ll give you that code and you’re free to use the showers whenever you want.

We saw quite a few rental RVs heading through here, so I assume for some reason this is a popular place to stop for many foreign travelers. There are several hiking trails around, but otherwise there isn’t much. The nearby towns are small and the biggest one, Cedar City, is probably an hour away.

One note of caution: if you do have a tent, make sure you have a way of securing it well.  It’s very hard to drive stakes into the ground here.  We used the ice pick from our kitchen box to make holes in the gravel pad, then drove the stakes in.

I’d definitely stay here again the next time we travel to this area of Utah. The other closest options are the campgrounds at Navajo Lake, but to get to those requires several miles of travel down a really dusty gravel road. They aren’t nearly as scenic or quiet as the sites at Point Supreme.

--
SHARES
  
# Comments

Leave a Reply

Trending Articles

Keep up with Tripleblaze

  Subscribe in a reader  

OR Daily Email Digest