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Tired of being stuck inside because your favorite trails are still covered in a blanket of snow? Hit the trail with Tubbs Xpedition Snowshoe!

Specs

Designed for backcountry use, the Xpedition is loaded with features that will get you where you want to go, no matter how deep the snow is.

The Pro-Step frame is made from durable-yet-lightweight aluminum with a stylish paint job (light blue for the ladies and orange for the men). But there is more than just a sexy paint job.  The frame is designed with ergonomics in mind. A slight curve from toe to heel reduces stress on muscles and joints while maintaining rigidity and excellent flotation.  The low toe to heel makes the Xpedition easier to pack away when they are not needed: an essential feature if they are only needed on higher mountain passes during spring and early summer hikes.

The SoftTec deck is made out of lightweight, durable fabric material that helps keep the weight of the snowshoes around 4.3 lbs for women and 5 lbs for men (weight depends on size) and offers amazing flotation.

To maintain stability, the Xpedition is equipped with ReAct bindings that are gender specific, easy to adjust, and extremely stable and secure with a comfortable fit. The RII Revolution Response system works with the ReAct bindings offers full toe rotation, making for a deep crampon bite in icy conditions while also delivering shock absorbing lateral flex to help maintain nature foot position. A 19-degree foot lift is an excellent addition for long uphill ascents to help maintain a more level foot position and reduce the strain on your legs.

While the grip is as not pronounced, don’t be fooled: located under the ball of your foot are the Cobra toe crampons and the Grappler heel cleats, which offer superior traction on the slipperiest sections of trail.

Performance

We selected a route that would encompass everything a weekend worrier would experience: we wanted to test the Xpedition through heavy snowdrifts for flotation, ice for crampon traction, and mixed terrain to get the overall performance and feel. Our test route followed the Eastern Continental Divide via the Blue Ridge Parkway and Mountains to Sea Trail for a spectacular winter camping experience. This section of trail offered dramatic elevation change, with a few flat sections with snowdrifts and close to 13 inches of fresh powder.

“The Xpedition is a wonderful snowshoe that keeps me floating on top of the snow with a small footprint,” said our reviewer Shalimar, who joined me out on the trail. “Maneuvering on the trail was quite simple and less awkward compared to longer snowshoes.”

With a platform and excellent grip, the Xpedition proved itself in some of the icier sections of trail. “When I saw ice I was worried I would start to slide around, but the crampons on the toes and grippers in the heel worked flawlessly.”

The ReAct bindings were simple to use and easy to adjust, but that was only needed when you took them on and off, which is a big plus.

“Overall I think this is a great snowshoe. On the steeper, rocky sections of trail I found it was easy to maneuver around obstacles, thanks to the smaller overall footprint. I would definitely recommend this if you spend a lot of time on more challenging trails and glacier travel, as they are easy to pack away or strap on your pack. They are a bit heavier than plastic-style frames. but the durability and maneuverability is more important when it comes to backcountry travel, in my opinion.”

Bottom Line

The Expedition Snowshoe is perfect for the backcountry. With a sturdy frame, excellent flotation, and easy to use bindings, this snowshoe is ideal if you find yourself in the more remote sections of the world during the winter. Oh, and then there is the color scheme: “I LOVE the color!” were the first words out of Shalimar’s mouth when we opened the box.

MSRP : $239.95

Thanks to Tubbs Snowshoes and Verde PR for organizing this review.

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